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Confident Milwaukee Bucks Filed Trademark for “Bucks in Six” Ahead of NBA Finals Game 6

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confident milwaukee bucks filed trademark for "bucks in six" ahead

How confident were the Milwaukee Bucks of winning Game 6 of the NBA Finals?

Confident enough that they applied for two stamps the day before the game: “Bucks in Six” and “Bucks in 6”.

The Bucks naturally prevailed 105-98 to win the series in six after losing two games to the Phoenix Suns. When it was over, the team was ready and offered fans a “Bucks in 6” NBA Champions jersey on their website.

The author of the phrase “Bucks in Six” is former Bucks player Brandon Jennings, who predicted in 2013 that the team would be the Miami Heat with LeBron, D-Wade, Chris Bosh and Ray Allen. Milwaukee lost in four.

Even so, the Bucks launched their own Twitter feed, “Bucks In Six,” which they were using again, saying at the time they had made equipment with Bucks in Six, proving that they used the brand in stores, a crucial step in making actually maintaining the brand.

Calls to Buck officials were not answered immediately.

Although Jennings is the author of the set, he has never claimed that he would or could be the owner.

“He couldn’t use ‘Bucks in Six’ for himself because he wasn’t entitled to the word ‘Bucks’,” said Josh Gerben of Gerben Law, a trademark attorney who discovered the filing on Friday morning.

It worked for the Bucks, unlike the New England Patriots.

Three days before the Patriots won a game against the Chargers in 2008 to advance to the Super Bowl, their owner, The Kraft Group, filed trademarks to take advantage of the Patriots’ perfect season if they had won the Super Bowl. The company registered the brands “Road To Perfection”, “19-0” and “Perfect Season”.

Despite the defeat against the New York Giants, the Patriots continued their search for the brands and received the “Perfect Season” in December 2016.

Even if they may not be, they could still benefit from others. It did so when the Los Angeles Lakers failed to win their third straight NBA title in 1989. Prior to the season, Lakers coach Pat Riley registered the “Three-Peat” trademark.

Riley made an undisclosed amount of money licensing to the Bulls in 1993 and 1996, the Yankees in 2000, and the Lakers in 2002.

There was more controversy in this submission as it did not include a team name. Riley never claimed he made the phrase up. Lakers players Byron Scott and Wes Matthews, whose son played for the Lakers last season, have both claimed they did but never considered using it as a trademark.

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